likes

Alternative Ways to Incorporate Facebook Into Your Blog or Website

One could argue a “Facebook Like” is the new “link” for SEO. One could also say the total of  “Likes” and comments is a measure of important or influence depending on the source. One thing we do know, however, is engagements such as a “Like” influences Edgerank and can catapult your content into the ever-important newsfeed of your subscribers. Below you’ll find some creative ways to capture additional Likes and comments for your content and increase the opportunities of capturing more social traffic to your website.

Add a Facebook Like Button at Bottom of Each Page

Have you ever visited a website and noticed a l ittle toolbar at the bottom of the site with a Like button in it? That little toolbar is called the Wibiya toolbar, and it gives people lots of options for your readers to connect. For example, they can Like your Facebook Page, see your stream, make a comment on your Facebook Page right from your website and, most importantly, Like your content. The Wibiya Toolbar is definitely a new way to increase engagement and Likes on your website.

Leverage WordPress Commenting Plugins

You might have heard about the Facebook Commenting system available for blogging technologies. Traditionally, I wouldn’t have recommended this as an option for two primary reasons:

  1. People need to sign into their Facebook account to leave a comment
  2. When people leave comments, the content is stored within the Facebook database… not on your site

Enter a solution: Livefyre – which is currently being used as Only Facebook’s comment solution.

  1. Livefyre allows users to login to leave a comment with either Facebook or an e-mail address
  2. This comment plugin allows users to tag their Facebook friends within the comments, post easily to Facebook and, most importantly, keep the contents of the comment on your site … not on Facebook’s database.

One thing is for sure, social media is here to stay. By leveraging these tips along with traditional tactics, Facebook will serve you up some fantastic traffic. How about you? How do you use Facebook on your site?

Facebook Posting via Apps Cuts Likes & Comments by 88%

Does posting to Facebook via third-party apps make any difference on the number of ‘Likes” and/or comments your posts receive? What about Facebook’s algorithm? Does the algorithm discriminate or suppress content management applications?

The Facebook Posting Test

The creators of Edgerank Checker, Applum, decided to try and find out by reviewing more than a million Facebook updates across 50,000+ Pages. The goal? To test the theory that posting to Facebook via third-party apps will not generate as much engagement compared to posting directly on Facebook.

The Results

Applum’s test results showed that posting via one of the top ten third-party APIs resulted in an average decrease of 88% fewer comments and likes when compared to posting to Facebook directly.

Why the Decrease?

Applum speculates that Facebook penalizes third-party apps within its complex algorithm. As you may have also noticed, some third-party Facebook updates are condensed into a single News Feed story.

This condensing action alone eliminates opportunities for the impressions and engagement you would normally get on separate posts.

Something else to consider is the simple fact Facebook users can decide to block all updates from any third-party app – which I know I have certainly done in the past.

Is the Content to Blame?

What about the content itself? Many posts generated via third-party apps tend to be scheduled or automated. This can certainly lead to weaker engagement as the content tends to be off-topic or poorly timed. Even worse, content from third-party apps is often not optimized for Facebook. For example, Twitter posts (which is arguably the most popular of third-party apps) do not normally include links with descriptions and thumbnails.

So is Facebook deliberately downgrading third-party apps? A Facebook spokesman told Mashable,

“We’re focused on ensuring that users see the highest quality stories in News Feed. As part of this, related stories are typically aggregated so users can see a consolidated view of stories from one app. In some cases, we work closely with trusted partners, such as Preferred Developer Consultants, to test new ways of surfacing stories, and gather feedback to improve the Platform experience.”

What have your experiences been? Do you work hard to post to Facebook yourself or do you use third-party apps? Will you be changing your strategy based on any of this data?

Get More Facebook Likes With These Simple Tips

Facebook recently provided Danny Sullivan with a plethora of stats during his research for this article. Some of those statistics revolved around data related to the best placement of the Like button in order to get Facebook likes. In this day and age of ‘everything social’ it is more and more important to have a strong strategy in place in order to build your social presence. With that in mind, I wanted to provide the following 4 tips to get more Facebook Likes.

According to Facebook, Like buttons get 3 to 5 times more clicks if:

  • The Like button version that shows thumbnails of friends is used
  • The like button allows people to add comments
  • If the like button appears at both the top and bottom of articles
  • If the like button appears near visual content like videos or graphics

If you don’t believe me, just read some of the astounding statistics MetaCafe reported after implementing these Facebook Like button tips:

  • The number of daily likes more than tripled, going from an average of 2,000 likes per day to over 7,000 likes.
  • Daily referral traffic from Facebook to Metacafe doubled, going from about 60,00 to 120,000.
  • Total Facebook actions (likes, shares, comments) rose to 20,000 per day.

So, it looks like you have some work to do but work with a lot of reward at the end!

What about you – what Facebook Like button tips have you found that work well?